Robert Glasscock's special 3-Hour workshop on "Solar Arcs: What They Are – How to Use Them" presented for Kepler College on November 4, 2017 stirred interest and even controversy from illustrating solar arc techniques in Donald Trump's and the United States' horoscopes. Additional information, including dates for specific midpoints with a description from Ebertine's book "The Combination of Stellar Influences," is listed in a previous article. In this article, Robert continues to track his Solar Arc predictions and current events.

Many astrologers are daunted by the challenges of mundane astrology (the astrology of world affairs, politics, economies, world figures and their influence). But learning to read such horoscopes is an excellent method of refining one's predictive abilities. Call it Probability Assessment. 

Reading "mundane" charts is also an excellent arena for learning to read objectively, since the temptation is always to read through the lens of one's political biases, party affiliation, etc. Will a liberal astrologer interpret a chart differently than a conservative one?

Kepler College's special 3-Hour workshop on "Solar Arcs: What They Are – How to Use Them" presented by Robert Glasscock on November 4, 2017 stirred interest and even controversy from its illustrations of solar arc techniques in Donald Trump's and the United States' horoscopes. In this article,  Robert expands on some of the points made and shows how you can effectively use transits to solar arcs.

Several terms in contemporary use are huddled under the umbrella of aspects in mundo: mundane conjunctions, squares and oppositions, parans, paranatellontai, mundane aspects and aspects in the mundane sphere. They all refer to that category of aspects which takes the Earth's equator as the point of reference, hence the Latin word mundo from mundus, that is, "the world."

Accordingly, instead of celestial longitude, which is the argument for aspects in zodiaco, aspects in mundo are generally reckoned in right ascension expressed in time, or less often in degrees of arc without a zodiacal sign attached.

Mundane aspects have fallen out of general use because they are regarded as too much of a bother to calculate from scratch, and right ascension has been omitted from most astrological ephemerides for decades. The only astrological ephemeris in print that gives right ascension as a tabular entry is The American Sidereal Ephemeris--no doubt because siderealists consider aspects in mundo the strongest class of aspects.